THE HIMALAYAN TALK: INDIAN GOVERNMENT FOOD SECURITY PROGRAM RISKIER

http://youtu.be/NrcmNEjaN8c The government of India has announced food security program ahead of elections in 2014. We discussed the issue with Palash Biswas in Kolkata today. http://youtu.be/NrcmNEjaN8c Ahead of Elections, India's Cabinet Approves Food Security Program ______________________________________________________ By JIM YARDLEY http://india.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/07/04/indias-cabinet-passes-food-security-law/

THE HIMALAYAN TALK: PALASH BISWAS CRITICAL OF BAMCEF LEADERSHIP

[Palash Biswas, one of the BAMCEF leaders and editors for Indian Express spoke to us from Kolkata today and criticized BAMCEF leadership in New Delhi, which according to him, is messing up with Nepalese indigenous peoples also. He also flayed MP Jay Narayan Prasad Nishad, who recently offered a Puja in his New Delhi home for Narendra Modi's victory in 2014.]

THE HIMALAYAN DISASTER: TRANSNATIONAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT MECHANISM A MUST

We talked with Palash Biswas, an editor for Indian Express in Kolkata today also. He urged that there must a transnational disaster management mechanism to avert such scale disaster in the Himalayas. http://youtu.be/7IzWUpRECJM

THE HIMALAYAN TALK: PALASH BISWAS LASHES OUT KATHMANDU INT'L 'MULVASI' CONFERENCE

अहिले भर्खर कोलकता भारतमा हामीले पलाश विश्वाससंग काठमाडौँमा आज भै रहेको अन्तर्राष्ट्रिय मूलवासी सम्मेलनको बारेमा कुराकानी गर्यौ । उहाले भन्नु भयो सो सम्मेलन 'नेपालको आदिवासी जनजातिहरुको आन्दोलनलाई कम्जोर बनाउने षडयन्त्र हो।' http://youtu.be/j8GXlmSBbbk

THE HIMALAYAN TALK: PALASH BISWAS LASHES OUT KATHMANDU INT'L 'MULVASI' CONFERENCE

अहिले भर्खर कोलकता भारतमा हामीले पलाश विश्वाससंग काठमाडौँमा आज भै रहेको अन्तर्राष्ट्रिय मूलवासी सम्मेलनको बारेमा कुराकानी गर्यौ । उहाले भन्नु भयो सो सम्मेलन 'नेपालको आदिवासी जनजातिहरुको आन्दोलनलाई कम्जोर बनाउने षडयन्त्र हो।' http://youtu.be/j8GXlmSBbbk

THE HIMALAYAN TALK: PALASH BISWAS BLASTS INDIANS THAT CLAIM BUDDHA WAS BORN IN INDIA

THE HIMALAYAN VOICE: PALASH BISWAS DISCUSSES RAM MANDIR

Published on 10 Apr 2013 Palash Biswas spoke to us from Kolkota and shared his views on Visho Hindu Parashid's programme from tomorrow ( April 11, 2013) to build Ram Mandir in disputed Ayodhya. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=77cZuBunAGk

THE HIMALAYAN TALK: PALSH BISWAS FLAYS SOUTH ASIAN GOVERNM

Palash Biswas, lashed out those 1% people in the government in New Delhi for failure of delivery and creating hosts of problems everywhere in South Asia. http://youtu.be/lD2_V7CB2Is

Palash Biswas on BAMCEF UNIFICATION!

THE HIMALAYAN TALK: PALASH BISWAS ON NEPALI SENTIMENT, GORKHALAND, KUMAON AND GARHWAL ETC.and BAMCEF UNIFICATION! Published on Mar 19, 2013 The Himalayan Voice Cambridge, Massachusetts United States of America

BAMCEF UNIFICATION CONFERENCE 7

Published on 10 Mar 2013 ALL INDIA BAMCEF UNIFICATION CONFERENCE HELD AT Dr.B. R. AMBEDKAR BHAVAN,DADAR,MUMBAI ON 2ND AND 3RD MARCH 2013. Mr.PALASH BISWAS (JOURNALIST -KOLKATA) DELIVERING HER SPEECH. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oLL-n6MrcoM http://youtu.be/oLL-n6MrcoM

Imminent Massive earthquake in the Himalayas

THE HIMALAYAN TALK: PALASH BISWAS CRITICIZES GOVT FOR WORLD`S BIGGEST BLACK OUT

THE HIMALAYAN TALK: PALASH BISWAS CRITICIZES GOVT FOR WORLD`S BIGGEST BLACK OUT

THE HIMALAYAN TALK: PALASH BISWAS TALKS AGAINST CASTEIST HEGEMONY IN SOUTH ASIA

Palash Biswas on Citizenship Amendment Act

Mr. PALASH BISWAS DELIVERING SPEECH AT BAMCEF PROGRAM AT NAGPUR ON 17 & 18 SEPTEMBER 2003 Sub:- CITIZENSHIP AMENDMENT ACT 2003 http://youtu.be/zGDfsLzxTXo

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Palash Biswas On Unique Identity No1.mpg

Friday, November 11, 2011

Kind attention Kalam Aiyar and his history making 'Can Doers' battalion.

Unquote:

When Japan Can't, Can you Dr Kalam Inc?

Sankara Narayanan 



QUOTE:

 

Japan's nuclear dilemma

http://www.thehindu.com/opinion/op-ed/article2615684.ece

N. GOPAL RAJ

 

Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda (right) looks at radiation levels being measured in the Fukushima prefecture in this October 2011 picture.

 

AFPJapanese Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda (right) looks at radiation levels being measured in the Fukushima prefecture in this October 2011 picture.

 

Anxiety over nuclear plant safety is driving Tokyo to rethink its earlier strategic energy plan which had envisaged, among other things, boosting the role of atomic power.

The accident at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, which led to tens of thousands of people being evacuated from radiation-affected areas in the vicinity, has left its government on the horns of a dilemma. What role should nuclear energy play in the country's energy mix?

Japan has always been acutely conscious of its dependence on imported coal, oil and natural gas for meeting the country's energy requirements. Such fossil fuel imports still provide over 80 per cent of the energy demands of the world's third largest economy.

Before the powerful earthquake of March 11 and the resulting tsunami crippled four of the six nuclear reactors at Fukushima Daiichi, the country's 54 commercial nuclear reactors were generating about a quarter of the country's electricity.

Japan's strategic energy plan, which was revised last year, had aimed to slash fossil fuel imports; increase the efficiency of energy use in all sectors; and boost the contribution from renewable energy and nuclear power. Nine new nuclear reactors were to be added by 2020 and at least five more in the following decade, doubling the proportion of electricity derived from nuclear power.

But now, faced with a public anxious about the safety of nuclear power plants, the Japanese government is having to rethink that plan. The former Prime Minister, Naoto Kan, went to the extent of promising to "leave nuclear energy behind." But that may not happen, at least not immediately.

At the end of August, Mr. Kan, who was criticised for mishandling the post-quake problems, stepped down as Prime Minister and was succeeded by his Finance Minister, Yoshihiko Noda.

Energy policy review

The current administration intended to undertake a "comprehensive energy policy review in this country," said Noriyuki Shikata, Deputy Cabinet Secretary for Public Relations and Director of Global Communications at the Prime Minister's Office. He was speaking in Tokyo to a group of Asian journalists, including this correspondent, who had been invited by Japan's Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Prime Minister Noda has been saying that, under the current circumstances, it would be very difficult to build new nuclear power plants, he noted. This would be reflected in the new energy policy that will be prepared by next summer. By spring next year, policy proposals would be made public so that the government could engage in consultations with stakeholders.

As for the three nuclear power plants under construction, the government would make a decision on a case-by-case basis in close consultation with the local municipalities, he said.

"But, as far as existing nuclear power plants are concerned, I think it is somewhat unrealistic to talk about abandoning all those nuclear power plants," he observed. "We need to secure enough power in this country."

Indeed, although Mr. Shikata did not explicitly say so, one immediate concern may well be to get more nuclear reactors up and running again as soon as possible. Currently, about three-quarters of the operational reactors have been shut down for maintenance, checks and the additional stress tests ordered by the government.

Till recently, only 10 of the country's commercial reactors were generating power. When a reactor at the Genkai plant in south-western Japan was restarted on November 1, it made news.

In Japan, while the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA) is the primary regulatory authority, the local government also has a say.

"We have de facto agreements in many cases between the Central government and the local municipalities," Mr. Shikata explained to the visiting journalists. When new nuclear power plants were constructed, the Central government tended to come up with some sort of agreement with the local municipalities over the management of those plants. So there was "a kind of semi-legal requirement" to consult with local municipalities and get their approval.

These days, however, the local authorities are cautious about giving clearances to start operating nuclear plants. According to a report in The New York Times, the governor of the local prefecture dithered before finally allowing the reactor at Genkai to be restarted.

"If we suppose that many of the nuclear power plants would not be restarted, we would face rather serious power shortages," warned Mr. Shikata. The gap, according to one simulation, could be as much as 10 per cent.

Regulatory framework

The Government is revamping the nuclear regulatory framework. Currently, the NISA comes under the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, leading to criticism that the regulatory body is too close to the nuclear industry.

The NISA is to be merged with the Nuclear Safety Commission, a body under the Cabinet Office that develops guidelines and provides expert advice, and placed under the Ministry of the Environment, according to Mr. Shikata.

The challenge for the new energy policy will be to restructure the country's energy mix for the short-, medium- and long-term, he observed. Although, Japan was already one of the most energy-efficient countries, "we wish to go further."

In addition, the government's policy was shifting towards more incentives for renewable energy technologies, he said. However, introducing renewable energy could take time and it was necessary to make sure that energy shortages did not develop in the process. Greater reliance on fossil fuels, such as natural gas, may be necessary in the short term.

Japan's business federation, Keidanren, had been making the case that unless there was a stable and not too expensive power supply available, it would be difficult to maintain the country's manufacturing base. The government did not want to see companies moving their operations overseas and "so this aspect also needs to be taken into account," added Mr. Shikata.

 

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