THE HIMALAYAN TALK: INDIAN GOVERNMENT FOOD SECURITY PROGRAM RISKIER

http://youtu.be/NrcmNEjaN8c The government of India has announced food security program ahead of elections in 2014. We discussed the issue with Palash Biswas in Kolkata today. http://youtu.be/NrcmNEjaN8c Ahead of Elections, India's Cabinet Approves Food Security Program ______________________________________________________ By JIM YARDLEY http://india.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/07/04/indias-cabinet-passes-food-security-law/

THE HIMALAYAN TALK: PALASH BISWAS CRITICAL OF BAMCEF LEADERSHIP

[Palash Biswas, one of the BAMCEF leaders and editors for Indian Express spoke to us from Kolkata today and criticized BAMCEF leadership in New Delhi, which according to him, is messing up with Nepalese indigenous peoples also. He also flayed MP Jay Narayan Prasad Nishad, who recently offered a Puja in his New Delhi home for Narendra Modi's victory in 2014.]

THE HIMALAYAN DISASTER: TRANSNATIONAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT MECHANISM A MUST

We talked with Palash Biswas, an editor for Indian Express in Kolkata today also. He urged that there must a transnational disaster management mechanism to avert such scale disaster in the Himalayas. http://youtu.be/7IzWUpRECJM

THE HIMALAYAN TALK: PALASH BISWAS LASHES OUT KATHMANDU INT'L 'MULVASI' CONFERENCE

अहिले भर्खर कोलकता भारतमा हामीले पलाश विश्वाससंग काठमाडौँमा आज भै रहेको अन्तर्राष्ट्रिय मूलवासी सम्मेलनको बारेमा कुराकानी गर्यौ । उहाले भन्नु भयो सो सम्मेलन 'नेपालको आदिवासी जनजातिहरुको आन्दोलनलाई कम्जोर बनाउने षडयन्त्र हो।' http://youtu.be/j8GXlmSBbbk

THE HIMALAYAN TALK: PALASH BISWAS LASHES OUT KATHMANDU INT'L 'MULVASI' CONFERENCE

अहिले भर्खर कोलकता भारतमा हामीले पलाश विश्वाससंग काठमाडौँमा आज भै रहेको अन्तर्राष्ट्रिय मूलवासी सम्मेलनको बारेमा कुराकानी गर्यौ । उहाले भन्नु भयो सो सम्मेलन 'नेपालको आदिवासी जनजातिहरुको आन्दोलनलाई कम्जोर बनाउने षडयन्त्र हो।' http://youtu.be/j8GXlmSBbbk

THE HIMALAYAN TALK: PALASH BISWAS BLASTS INDIANS THAT CLAIM BUDDHA WAS BORN IN INDIA

THE HIMALAYAN VOICE: PALASH BISWAS DISCUSSES RAM MANDIR

Published on 10 Apr 2013 Palash Biswas spoke to us from Kolkota and shared his views on Visho Hindu Parashid's programme from tomorrow ( April 11, 2013) to build Ram Mandir in disputed Ayodhya. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=77cZuBunAGk

THE HIMALAYAN TALK: PALSH BISWAS FLAYS SOUTH ASIAN GOVERNM

Palash Biswas, lashed out those 1% people in the government in New Delhi for failure of delivery and creating hosts of problems everywhere in South Asia. http://youtu.be/lD2_V7CB2Is

Palash Biswas on BAMCEF UNIFICATION!

THE HIMALAYAN TALK: PALASH BISWAS ON NEPALI SENTIMENT, GORKHALAND, KUMAON AND GARHWAL ETC.and BAMCEF UNIFICATION! Published on Mar 19, 2013 The Himalayan Voice Cambridge, Massachusetts United States of America

BAMCEF UNIFICATION CONFERENCE 7

Published on 10 Mar 2013 ALL INDIA BAMCEF UNIFICATION CONFERENCE HELD AT Dr.B. R. AMBEDKAR BHAVAN,DADAR,MUMBAI ON 2ND AND 3RD MARCH 2013. Mr.PALASH BISWAS (JOURNALIST -KOLKATA) DELIVERING HER SPEECH. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oLL-n6MrcoM http://youtu.be/oLL-n6MrcoM

Imminent Massive earthquake in the Himalayas

THE HIMALAYAN TALK: PALASH BISWAS CRITICIZES GOVT FOR WORLD`S BIGGEST BLACK OUT

THE HIMALAYAN TALK: PALASH BISWAS CRITICIZES GOVT FOR WORLD`S BIGGEST BLACK OUT

THE HIMALAYAN TALK: PALASH BISWAS TALKS AGAINST CASTEIST HEGEMONY IN SOUTH ASIA

Palash Biswas on Citizenship Amendment Act

Mr. PALASH BISWAS DELIVERING SPEECH AT BAMCEF PROGRAM AT NAGPUR ON 17 & 18 SEPTEMBER 2003 Sub:- CITIZENSHIP AMENDMENT ACT 2003 http://youtu.be/zGDfsLzxTXo

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Monday, November 2, 2015

https://youtu.be/PVSAo0CXCQo KOMAL GANDHAR!Forget not Ritwik Ghatak and his musicality, melodrama,sound design,frames to understand Partition of India!

https://youtu.be/PVSAo0CXCQo


KOMAL GANDHAR!Forget not Ritwik Ghatak and his musicality, melodrama,sound design,frames to understand Partition of India!

Palash Biswas


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ym-F7lAMlHk

They kept the Zamindari and their Riyasat and partitioned India,Indian people and turned the nation into Zamindari,Riyasat.It is the caste class hegemony against which Ritwik Ghatak made his films!Komal Gandhar is the masterpiece to understand India and us,the Indian People!

It is overlapping Abhigyan Shkuntalam and the Buffer shot zooms in present scenario of BEEF BAN and BEEF Festival,both of which oppose India and Indian people!Polarizing us with religious and caste identities.It is politics as as well as the economics of Free Marge Global Order,Global Hindutva and governance of Fascism!

The story is about partition and its impact,IPTA and Indian Communist movement!


I am grateful to You Tube for the clippings!I am grateful to Ei Samay for Kumar Sahani interviewed which opened the opportunity for me to discuss the Partition of India,transfer of population and its impact.I extended the frame of the Webcam and the frame.It is an experiment. If you endorse it,I may present other stories of partition!

Komal Gandhar

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Komal Gandhar (Bengali: কোমল গান্ধার Kōmal Gāndhār),[1] also known as A Soft Note on a Sharp Scale, is a 1961 Bengali film[2] written and directed by noted film maker Ritwik Ghatak.[3][4][5] The title refers to the Hindustaniequivalent of "E-flat". It was part of the trilogy, Meghe Dhaka Tara (1960), Komal Gandhar, and Subarnarekha (1962), all dealing with the aftermath of the Partition of India in 1947 and the refugees coping with it, though this was the most optimistic film of his oeuvre.[6] The film explores three themes juxtaposed in the narrative, the dilemma of Anusuya, the lead character, divided leadership of IPTA and the fallout of the partition of India.[7]



I was born in a refugee resettlement colony.I was brought up there and witnessed the absent humanscape and landscape,the lost musicality,sound system,six seasons and overwhelming folk,the tragedy,the flowing Padma and Madhumati rivers,the calamities,the association with nature from which they never recovered.


It is the unprecedented violence,the hatred campaign we inherit from the partition of India,even the institutional fascism,continuous holocaust across the border,the disintegration,the personality disorder,Social disorder and disorganization and political anarchy and terror!As we lose the legacy of universal fraternity,association with Nature,celebration of life,mother tongue,homeland everything even the civic and human rights,citizenship!


Komal Gandhar and every film made by Ritwik Ghatak is all about aesthetics of social realism inherited by Nabarun Bhattacharya in his writings.It is complete degeneration,loss of identity and faith,eligion!


The Ultimate human tragedy is the story of Komal Gandhar.It is the story of Indian People`s theatre and alternative cinema,alternative media,art and literature.


I dare to deal with the masterpiece just because it is mandatory in an environment of riotous civil war because of Hindutva agenda and the latest BEEF Scandal to divide the country with religious and caste identity.If we have to stop this nonsense,we have to understand the phenomenon of partition and its overlapping impact,the lost musicality which is the soul of Indian cinema.We have to go through the melodrama of the partition Holocaust.


Komal Gandhar

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Komal Gandhar

(A Soft Note on a Sharp Scale)

Komal Gandhar DVD cover

Komal Gandhar DVD cover

Directed by

Ritwik Ghatak

Produced by

Ritwik Ghatak

Screenplay by

Ritwik Ghatak

Music by

Jyotirindra Moitra

Lyrics: Rabindranath Tagore

Cinematography

Dilip Ranjan Mukhopadhyay

Edited by

Ramesh Joshi

Release dates

31 March 1961

Country

India

Language

Bengali

Komal Gandhar (Bengali: কোমল গান্ধার Kōmal Gāndhār),[1] also known as A Soft Note on a Sharp Scale, is a 1961 Bengali film[2] written and directed by noted film maker Ritwik Ghatak.[3][4][5] The title refers to the Hindustaniequivalent of "E-flat". It was part of the trilogy, Meghe Dhaka Tara (1960), Komal Gandhar, and Subarnarekha (1962), all dealing with the aftermath of the Partition of India in 1947 and the refugees coping with it, though this was the most optimistic film of his oeuvre.[6] The film explores three themes juxtaposed in the narrative, the dilemma of Anusuya, the lead character, divided leadership of IPTA and the fallout of the partition of India.[7]

Contents

 [hide]

Overview[edit]

The title was taken from the line of a poem[a] by Rabindranath Tagore that meant a sur or note, E-flat. As in other films by Ghatak, music plays a pivotal role in the movie.

Through the microcosmic perspectivising of a group of devoted and uncompromising IPTA workers, Ghatak with his signature style touches on varied issues of partition, idealism, corruption, the interdependence of art and life, the scope of art, and class-struggle. Unlike his other films, this one runs along an upbeat mood with the lead pair of lovers (Vrigu and Anusua) being reunited.

Cast[edit]

Soundtrack[edit]

Music was by Jyotirindra Moitra, from IPTA, and a noted Rabindra Sangeet exponent who had previously given music in Ghatak's Meghe Dhaka Tara (1960), and had song by singers like, Bijon Bhattacharya, Debabrata Biswas, Hemanga Biswas. Bahadur Khan played sarod in the soundtrack. The film is noted for its wedding songs and also contrapuntal use of sound.[8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Citation[edit]

Ritwik Ghatak

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

It has been suggested that Bagalar Banga Darshan be merged into this article. (Discuss) Proposed since May 2014.


Ritwik Ghatak

ঋত্বিক কুমার ঘটক

Image of Ritwik Ghatak, a Bengali film director

Image of Ritwik Ghatak

Native name

ঋত্বিক কুমার ঘটক

Born

Ritwik Kumar Ghatak

4 November 1925

Dhaka, Bangladesh

Died

6 February 1976 (aged 50)

Kolkata, West Bengal, India

Occupation

Film maker and writer

Nationality

Bangladeshi

Citizenship

BAngladeshi

Notable works

Nagarik, Ajantrik,Subarnarekha, Meghe Dhaka Tara

Notable awards

Padma Shri

National Film Award's Rajat Kamal Award Best Story forJukti Takko Aar Gappo

Best Director's Award from Bangladesh Cine Journalist's Association for Titash Ekti Nadir Naam

Spouse

Surama Ghatak[1]

Children

Ritaban Ghatak (son)

Samhita Ghatak (daughter)

Suchismita Ghatak (daughter)[2]

Relatives

Manish Ghatak (elder brother),Mahasweta Devi (niece),

Ghatak Family Tree

Ritwik Ghatak (Bengali: ঋত্বিক কুমার ঘটক, Ritbik Kumar Ghôţôk, About this sound listen (help·info); 4 November 1925 – 6 February 1976)[3] was a Bengalifilmmaker and script writer. Along with prominent contemporary Bengali filmmakers Satyajit Ray and Mrinal Sen, his cinema is primarily remembered for its meticulous depiction of social reality. Although their roles were often adversarial, they were ardent admirers of each other's work and, in doing so, the three directors charted the independent trajectory of parallel cinema, as a counterpoint to the mainstream fare of Hindi cinema in India. Ghatak received many awards in his career, including National Film Award's Rajat Kamal Awardfor Best Story in 1974 for his Jukti Takko Aar Gappo[4] and Best Director's Award from Bangladesh Cine Journalist's Association for Titash Ekti Nadir Naam. The Government of India honoured him with the Padma Shri for Arts in 1970.[5][6]

Contents

 [hide]

Early life[edit]

Ritwik Ghatak was born in Dhaka in East Bengal (now Bangladesh).[7]Ghatak's father Suresh Chandra Ghatak was a district magistrate and a poet and playwright; his mother's name was Indubala Devi. He and his twin sister Prateeti, were the youngest of nine children. The other children were Manish, Sudhish, Tapati, Sampreeti, Brototi, Ashish Chandra and Lokesh Chandra. He and his family moved to Calcutta (now Kolkata) just before millions of other refugees from East Bengal began to flood into the city, fleeing the catastrophicBengal famine of 1943 and the partition of Bengal in 1947. Identification with this tide of refugees was to define his practice, providing an over-ridingmetaphor for cultural dismemberment and exile that unified his subsequent creative work. The 1971 Bangladesh Liberation War, which led to more refugees fleeing to India, was to have a similar impact on his work.

Family[edit]

Ritwik married Surama Devi, niece of active left-wing member, Sadhana Roychowdhury. They separated and she went to her ancestral place, Shillong after Ritwik was temporarily sent to a mental hospital. They had three children: son Ritaban and two daughters. Ritaban is a filmmaker[8] in his own right and is involved in the Ritwik Memorial Trust. He has restored Ritwik's Bagalar Banga Darshan, Ronger Golam and completed his unfinished documentary on Ramkinkar. He has also made a film titled Unfinished Ritwik. He is now working on adapting Bibhutibhushan Bandopadhyay's short story 'Ichhamati'. Ritwik's elder daughter Samhita, has made a docufeature titled Nobo Nagarik. His younger daughter died in 2009.[9]Ghatak's elder brother Manish Ghatak was a radical writer of his time, a professor of English and a social activist who was deeply involved with the IPTA theatre movement in its heyday and later on headed the Tebhaga Andolan of North Bengal. Manish Ghatak's daughter is the writer and activist Mahasweta Devi.

Creative career[edit]

In 1948, Ghatak wrote his first play Kalo sayar (The Dark Lake) and participated in a revival of the landmark playNabanna.[10] In 1951, Ghatak joined the Indian People's Theatre Association (IPTA). He wrote, directed and acted in plays and translated Bertolt Brecht and Gogol into Bengali. In early 1970s, he wrote and directed his last play Jwala (The Burning). The music director was Darbar Bhaduri, who was called by Ghatak 'Dada' or 'Guru' from his childhood. Ghatak was greatly inspired by Darbar Bhaduri. In Rajshahi, Bangladeh—his homeland Ritwik lived beside Bhaduri's house. Almost all time he was with Darbar Bhaduri. Darbar Bhaduri was a 'King maker' who kept away from outside world. Ghatak by pressure made Darbar Bhaduri the music director of Jwala, and the music was extraordinary.

Ghatak entered the film industry with Nimai Ghosh's Chinnamul (1950) as actor and assistant director. Chinnamul was followed in two years by Ghatak's first completed film Nagarik (1952), both major breakthroughs for the Indian cinema.[11][12] Ghatak's early work sought theatrical and literary precedent in bringing together a documentary realism, a stylised performance often drawn from the folk theatre, and a Brechtian use of the filmic apparatus.

Ghatak's first commercial release was Ajantrik (1958), a comedy-drama film with science fiction themes. It was one of the earliest Indian films to portray an inanimate object, in this case an automobile, as a character in the story.

Ghatak's greatest commercial success as a script writer was for Madhumati (1958), one of the earliest films to deal with the theme of reincarnation. It was a Hindi film directed by another Bengali filmmaker Bimal Roy. It earned Ghatak his first award nomination, for the Filmfare Best Story Award.

Ritwik Ghatak directed eight full-length films. His best-known films, Meghe Dhaka Tara (The Cloud-Capped Star) (1960),Komal Gandhar (E-Flat) (1961), and Subarnarekha (Golden Lining) (1962), a trilogy based in Calcutta and addressing the condition of refugee-hood, proved controversial and the commercial failure of Komal Gandhar (E-Flat) and Subarnarekhaprevented him from making features through the remainder of the 1960s. In all three, he used a basic and at times starkly realistic storyline, upon which he inscribed a range of mythic references, especially of the 'Mother Deliverer', through a dense overlay of visual and aural registers.

Ritwik Ghatak, at young age

Ghatak moved briefly to Pune in 1966, where he taught at the Film and Television Institute of India (FTII). During his year at FTII, he was involved in the making of two student films: Fear and Rendezvous.

Ghatak returned to filmmaking in the 1970s, when a Bangladeshi producer financed the 1973 epic Titash Ekti Nadir Naam (A River Called Titas). Making films became difficult because of his poor health due to extreme alcoholism and consequent diseases. His last film was the autobiographical Jukti Takko Aar Gappo (Reason, Debate And Story) (1974), in which he portrayed Neelkantha (Nilkanth) the lead character.[13] He also had a number of incomplete feature and short films in his credit.

Impact and influence[edit]

A scene from Ghatak's last film Jukti Takko Aar Gappo (1974)

At the time of his death (February 1976), Ghatak's primary impact would seem to have been through former students. Though his stint teaching film at FTII was brief, one-time students Mani Kaul, John Abraham, and especially Kumar Shahani (among many others),[14] carried Ghatak's ideas and theories, which were further elaborated upon in his book Cinema And I, into the mainstream of Indian art film. Other students of his at the FTII included the acclaimed filmmakers Saeed Akhtar Mirza and Adoor Gopalakrishnan.[15]

Ghatak stood entirely outside the world of Indian commercial film. None of the elements of the commercial cinema (singing and dancing, melodrama, stars, glitz) featured in his work.[citation needed] He was watched by students and intelligentsia, not by the masses. His students have tended to work in the art cinema or independent cinema tradition.

While other neo-realist directors like Satyajit Ray succeeded in creating an audience outside India during their lifetime, Ghatak was not so fortunate. While he was alive, his films were appreciated primarily within India. Satyajit Ray did what he could to promote his colleague, but Ray's generous praise did not translate into international fame for Ghatak. For example, Ghatak's Nagarik (1952) was perhaps the earliest example of a Bengali art film, preceding Ray's Pather Panchali by three years but was not released until after his death in 1977.[11][12] His first commercial release Ajantrik (1958) was one of the earliest Indian films to portray an inanimate object, an automobile, as a character in the story, many years before theHerbie films.[16] Ghatak's Bari Theke Paliye (1958) had a similar plot to François Truffaut's The 400 Blows (1959), but Ghatak's film remained obscure while Truffaut's went on to become one of the most famous of the French New Wave. One of Ghatak's final films, Titash Ekti Nadir Naam (1973), is one of the earliest to be told in a hyperlink format, featuring multiple characters in a collection of interconnected stories, predating Robert Altman's Nashville (1975) by two years.

Ghatak's only major commercial success was Madhumati (1958), a Hindi film which he wrote the screenplay for. It was one of the earliest to deal with the theme of reincarnation and is believed to have been the source of inspiration for many later works dealing with reincarnation in Indian cinema, Indian television, and perhaps world cinema. It may have been the source of inspiration for the American film The Reincarnation of Peter Proud (1975) and the Hindi film Karz (1980), both of which dealt with reincarnation and have been influential in their respective cultures.[17] Karz in particular was remade several times: as the Kannada film Yuga Purusha (1989), the Tamil film Enakkul Oruvan (1984), and more recently theBollywood Karzzzz (2008). Karz and The Reincarnation of Peter Proud may have inspired the American Chances Are(1989).[17] The most recent film to be directly inspired by Madhumati was the hit Bollywood film Om Shanti Om (2007), which led to the late Bimal Roy's daughter Rinki Bhattacharya accusing it of plagiarism and threatening legal action against its producers.[18][19]

Ghatak's work as a director had an impact on many later Indian filmmakers, including those from the Bengali film industryand elsewhere. Ghatak is said to have influences on Kumar Shahani, Mani Kaul, Ketan Mehta, and Adoor Gopalakrishnan. For example, Mira Nair has cited Ghatak as well as Ray as the reasons she became a filmmaker.[20] Ghatak's impact as a director began to spread beyond India much later; beginning in the 1990s, a project to restore Ghatak's films was undertaken, and international exhibitions (and subsequent DVD releases) have belatedly generated an increasingly global audience. In a critics' poll of all-time greatest films conducted by the Asian film magazine Cinemaya in 1998, Subarnarekhawas ranked at No. 11.[21] In the 2002 Sight & Sound critics' and directors' poll for all-time greatest films, Meghe Dhaka Tarawas ranked at No. 231 and Komal Gandhar at No. 346.[22] In 2007, A River Named Titas topped the list of 10 bestBangladeshi films, as chosen in the audience and critics' polls conducted by the British Film Institute.[23] Russia-born German actress Elena Kazan once said Ghatak's Jukti Takko Gappo has the most profound influence on her view about world cinema.[24]

Bangladeshi filmmaker Shahnewaz Kakoli said she has been greatly influenced by Ritwik Ghatak's films and regarded Ghatak as her idol. She told–[25]

Like all Bengalis, I too have grown up watching movies of Satyajit Ray and Ghatak, though I like Ghatak more and I idolise him. I am greatly inspired by him and consequently my movie 'Uttarer Sur' (Northern Symphony) too is influenced by Ghatak.

Works[edit]

Main article: List of works of Ritwik Ghatak

Though Ghatak is mainly known as film director, he wrote many stories and plays. In his creative career, Ghatak made eight full-length feature films and few short films and documentaries. He also wrote many short stories, plays and poetries. Ghatak wrote more than 50 articles and essays on film.

Ideology[edit]

Ghatak was not only a film director, he was a theorist, too. His views and commentaries on films have been parts of scholarly studies and researches. As a filmmaker his main concentration was on men and life and specially the day-to-day struggle of ordinary men. He could never accept the partition of India of 1947 which divided Bengal into two countries. In almost all his film he dealt with this theme.[26]

Filmmaking was not only art for him. In his opinion it was only a means to the end of serving people: It was only a means of expressing his anger at the sorrows and sufferings of his people.[27]

Awards, honours and recognitions[edit]

  • Padma Shri for Arts in 1970 by The Government of India.[5][6]

  • Musafir had won the Certificate of Merit for Third Best Feature Film at 5th National Film Awards in 1957.[28]

  • Madhumati Nominated for Filmfare Best Story Award.[29]

  • National Film Award's Rajat Kamal Award for Best Story in 1974 for Jukti Takko Aar Gappo].

  • Best Director's award from Bangladesh Cine Journalist's Association for Titash Ekti Nadir Naam.

  • Ajantrik got special entry in the Venice Film Festival in 1959.

  • In a critics' poll of all-time greatest films conducted by Asian film magazine Cinemaya in 1998, Subarnarekha was ranked at No. 11 on the list.

  • In the 2002 Sight & Sound critics' and directors' poll for all-time greatest films, Meghe Dhaka Tara was ranked at No. 231 and Komal Gandhar at No. 346 on the list.

  • In 2007, A River Named Titas topped the list of 10 best Bangladeshi films, as chosen in the audience and critics' polls conducted by the British Film Institute.

  • Heerer Prajapati had won the Best Children's Film Award (Prime Minister's Gold Medal) at 16th National Film Awards in 1970.[30]

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]


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